Mystery Bridge: Name that bridge! Part I: A suspension bridge with three towers

During our recent trip to the south of Germany, we happened to visit a Medieval Town that is most beloved by many Americans and Brits alike. It was located on a small river but was walled  in its entirety, thus receiving the name “Altstadt” (or old town). While the old town has two historic town squares and many churches, it also prides itself on its bridges all but one of which date as far back as the 1600s. That lone exception is our Mystery Bridge. When you look at the following pics below, you may think that this pedestrian bridge was built in the early 1900s. Yet (as the only hint given to you), it is the first suspension built of iron that was built in Germany, constructed in 1824. Another interesting feature is the number of towers that support the cable and bridge deck. Normally, a suspension bridge has even-numbered towers instead of the odd-numbered ones, like what we have here in the picture- there are only three towers that support the iron cable and decking- two on the opposite banks and one in the middle on a small island.

This leads to the following questions:

1. Do you know of another suspension bridge in the world that still exists and has odd-numbered towers and…

2. What is the name and location of this lovely bridge? (It is located next to another popular bridge built in the 1300s) Naming the city the bridge is located is also an acceptable answer.

Please leave your answers in the comment section. The answers will take you by surprise for a segment on the bridges in the region where this bridge will come later this summer. This region has one of the most popular Christmas Markets in Germany and is a great place to go skiing.

Good luck with the guessing! :-)

PHOTOS (Taken in July 2012):

Oblique view with the house bridge in the background

Deck view with the three towers

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2 Responses to Mystery Bridge: Name that bridge! Part I: A suspension bridge with three towers

  1. 1. Roebling’s bridge at Lackawaxen has three towers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roebling's_Delaware_Aqueduct).

    2. The German bridge is the Kettensteg, in Nuremburg.

  2. Pingback: How to save the Long Shoals Bridge | The Bridgehunter's Chronicles

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